Art conservation

House Grime and Yellowed Varnish on Oil Paintings- What Are Your Options?

This oil  painting’s varnish is covered with grime and discolored- yellowed leaving the original colors dim and darker than the artist had originally intended. If you are thinking about whether you should have a painting cleaned, remember this: cleaning artwork is usually an aesthetic issue/question… not a preservation question. If all you are concerned about is preserving the painting, then don’t have it cleaned. If you want to have it look its best, then cleaning may be required.

Also on this painting; towards the lower left side there is a small 2″ tear in the canvas. This is a preservation problem to be corrected. But here also you will be asked to make a decision: to patch or to “line” the painting. Actually, there is third choice. We don’t patch paintings because they set into motion other problems in the future (cracking patterns, puckering/bulges). But a local “reweaving” of the rip may be possible and the rip may be repaired without a patch and without lining. Your local conservator/restorer can explain this to you. Each choice has a long term preservation consequence.

The lost paint at the rip will then need to be filled and inpainted to match perfectly. If you decide to have the painting cleaned and treat the rip so it is not visible, after restoration the painting will have brighter colors, enhanced depth of field, the tear will disappear and the varnish will look even and clear. Then, you’ll need to think about lighting at home or the office… but that’s another blog post.

Here’s a quick video that may be of interest:

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Here’s another 30 second video

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Poor Storage causes damaged paintings

Two deep dents on the bottom of the painting

This painting is not flaking or falling apart immediately. In other words, there is no emergency action needed to save the painting. So if these problems don’t get taken care of right away, all will not be lost. Damage in the form of cracking is now in the process of forming and becoming evident.

To keep these damages from happening, do not lean anything on the painting. Cover front and back with card box, or place in a cardboard mirror box. Do not store where the temperature gets too hot or too cold, or where it gets humid or moldy.

When you have a damaged painting, your home owner’s insurance policy may help you pay for it, and may even pay you for lost value. For more information about this, go to www.insurancepersonalpropertyassessments.com or call us at 805 564 3438

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Fine Art Conservation

Conservation questions? Go to www.fineartconservationlab.com

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Cracks Cause By Heating Vents

Cracking badly!

Keep art work away from heating vents that will cause cracking and flaking. (Same goes for active fireplaces), never use cleaning liquids on paintings,and last but not least, never try to clean painting with solvents.

 Careful inspections will help save flaking paint. If you find flaking paint, the best thing to do is call an art conservation laboratory for advice. There are emergency treatments you can do at home on most paintings. But it is still good to get some advice.

It is important to remember that we can save the original paint in almost every type of flaking condition. This type of preservation/conservation treatment preserves the original nature of the painting, helps the painting to retain its highest value and in the end will require less inpainting.

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Save Your Stuff  (Home)

Save Your Stuff From A Disaster (Office-Workplace)

Fine Art Conservation

Conservation questions? Go to www.fineartconservationlab.com

Appraisal questions? www.faclappraisals.com

For great stories, videos and tips see www.tipsforartcollectors.org (Free downloads, sign up for blog updates)

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